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Lucy Lane

 

 

 

  


This page is going to amaze you. The author of this page is Lucy Jensen, a magnificent musician, teacher and poet. Lucy and her husband, Truman, and I collaborated in teaching classes years ago for San Diego State University. Some of you may remember the Make-It-Take-It classes that were held at Pepper Drive School.

Lucy has given me permission to place her poems and songs on this page. She reserves all rights to her lovely lyrics and songs, which means that you may not change the wording or reproduce it for commercial sales. Classroom teachers may copy them for use in their classrooms, and make charts for their children. Please make sure that you put Lucy Jensen's name on anything you reproduce or enlarge.

 

 

 

  


Page Index
(Click on links)

Animal Antics
Flap, Flap, Flap Your Ears

Do You Suppose?
The Elephant Knows
I've Seen One in the Zoo
Elephant Sounds
A Lateral Gait
Tell Me How You Use Your Trunk
The Elephant's Trunk
Holding Hands
A Special Species Cycle
Rhino, Rhino
How Did You Get Your Name?
Wallow Time

 

Holiday Happenings
A Christmas Round
Valentine Round
A Song for February
Lively Little Leprechaun
L.L.L. Whose Initials are These?
Irish Jig Jingle
Lucky Leprechaun
A Leprechaun Story/Poem for Believers
Leprechauno
Lucky Me!
I Thought I Saw a Leprechaun
The Peter Rabbit Scrunch
Where is Peter?
What Do You  Take for a Tummy Ache?
The Escape
The Sparrow Song
Oh, Dear! What Can the Matter Be?
Mrs. Rabbit's Warning
Easter Things
Patriotic Round
That's What He Says on Halloween Night
Down in the Graveyard
The Bone Bounce
Pizza and Pumpkin Pie
Angel Band Operetta (Go to Drama Drive)

 

Mother Nature
Oh, Rainbow Fair
In the Heart of a Seed
That's the Way the Flowers Grow
Who Has Seen the Wind?

Songs of the Seasons
Springtime Round
Another Springtime Round
Signs of Spring
Spring Fever
Spring Song
Puddles
Rain
Rain is Raining All Around
April Showers
Good Old Summertime
Autumn Leaves
When the  Birdies Open Wide
 

Phonics Fun
Old Mark Farmer


Math Magic

Counting Along Song
Pig Sty Song
Count by Tens
Multiples Melody (by twos)
Multiples Melody (by threes)
Multiples Melody (by sixes)

Miscellaneous Music
A Morning Song
Let It Start With You and Me
Earth Day

 

 

 

 

Animal Antics

  

    

"Flap, Flap, Flap Your Ears"
(Tune: Row, Row, Row Your Boat)

     Flap, Flap, Flap your ears,
     In a forest pool.
          Flippity!
               Flappity!
                    Flippity!
                         Flappity!
     Trying to keep cool!

     Swish, Swish, Swish your tail,
     On a summer day.
          Slippity!
               Slappity!
                    Slippity!
                         Slappity!
     Keep the bugs away!

 

 

 

 

"Do You Suppose?"
(Tune: Oats, Peas, Beans)

     Do you suppose the elephant knows,
     The elephant knows he grows a nose,
     He grows a nose like a garden hose?
     Do you suppose the elephant knows?

     

The Elephant Knows
(A Poem)

     The elephant knows
          He grows a nose
               That's longer
                    Than any other.
     Do you suppose
          He blows his nose
               To make us
                    Run for cover?

  

 

 

 

  

     

"I've Seen One in the Zoo"
(Tune: Buffalo Gals)

     The elephant has a very long snout,
     Very long snout,
     Very long snout;
     I really know what I'm talking about
     'Cause I've seen one in the zoo, have you?
     Yes, I've seen one in the zoo!

     His tail is short without a doubt,
     Without a doubt,
     Without a doubt;
     I really know what I'm talking about
     'Cause I've seen one in the zoo, have you?
     Yes, I've seen one in the zoo!

 

 

  

     
"Elephant Sounds"

A Poem

     What are the sounds an elephant makes
          To talk to his forest friends?
     Does he purr or grumble, roar or rumble,
          Whenever a message he sends?
     I'm told he can trumpet with his head held high,
          Or scream and snort when he pleases,
     But does anyone know how an elephant sounds
          When he throws back his head and sneezes?

     

 

 

  

     
"A Lateral Gait?"

(Tune: "Oh, Where, Oh Where . . .")

     The elephant walks with a lateral gait.
     He sways from side to side.
     He picks up both feet, on the left, then the right,
     And gives you a roll-around ride!

     The elephant walks with a lateral gait,
     But gallop or trot, he cannot.
     Both feet on one side come together in stride,
     To move him from spot to spot.

     The elephant runs with a lateral gait,
     Along at a speedy pace.
     He runs on his toes, and as everyone knows,
     He'll beat you and me in a race!

Lucy's note: "This song emphasizes a few facts about the way an elephant moves. Like a camel or giraffe, both feet on one side are lifted together as he walks or runs. This gives a rolling motion to the back. (Cats and dogs walk with a diagonal gait.) Elephants cannot gallop or trot or jump. However, they can run faster than a man in a short sprint. Like rhinoceroses, they run on their toes."

     

 

 

  

     
"Tell Me How You Use Your Trunk"

(Tune: "This Old Man")

Lucy's note; "Divide your class in half; one side asks, the other side answers."

Question:
     Elephant! Elephant!
     Tell me how you use your trunk.
Answer:
     To reach way up high into the forest trees,
     Picking tender shoots to eat.

Question:
     Elephant! Elephant!
     Tell me how you use your trunk.
Answer:
     To reach way down low and eat a clump of grass,
     Then blow dust upon my back.

Question:
     Elephant! Elephant!
     Tell me how you use your trunk.
Question:
     To dip in the lake and give myself a bath,
     Then sound out a trumpet blast!

    

 

 

  

     

"The Elephant's Trunk"
A Poem

     He uses it to reach up high
          And pull the tender leaves,
               To stuff them in his hungry mouth
                    And grind them up with ease.

     He uses it to take a drink
           And give himself a shower.
               If he chooses, he can use it,
                    To pick a dainty flower.

     He uses it so lovingly
          To give a fond caress,
               Or he can wave it in the air
                    And trumpet in distress.

     He uses it to smell the air
          For food or danger near,
               To get the scent of humankind,
                    A poacher he must fear.

     He uses it to work for man
          To build man's farming home,
               To push down trees . . .
                    And clear the leaves . . .
                         Where elephants used to roam.

Lucy's note: "A sad, ironic fat is that elephants are used in the logging industry to destroy their own habitat."

    

 

 

  

 
"Holding Hands"
(Based on a poem by Lenore Link)
(Tune: "Coming 'Round the Mountain")

Oh, the elephants hold hands by holding tails.
Oh, the elephants hold hands by holding tails.
When they walk in forest shade,
     Or in a circus tent parade,
          It never fails,
               They're holding hands 
                    By holding tails!

 

 

 

"A Special Species Cycle"
(Who Am I?)
(Tune: "You Are My Sunshine")

Lucy's note: This may be read as poetry or sung. It is intended for 3rd or 4th grade students. Students need a copy due to the length of the saga.

     Tailless amphibian, is what I am.
     I live in water; sometimes on land.
     I am a big frog; I am the largest.
     Try to guess my name if you can.

     When I was first born, it was in springtime,
     From eggs in water, I wriggled out.
     A tiny tadpole, one centimeter,
     Had no legs, no eyes, and no mouth!

     Out of my head grew some gills for breathing,
     I soon developed my eyes and mouth.
     I nibbled plants with a tiny tooth-beak,
     As I started swimming about.

     I ate all summer and in the fall.
     I hid from beetles and birdies all,
     And then I swam to the muddy bottom,
     Where I slept all winter long.

     When springtime came and I awoke,
     I started eating and growing more.
     And when the winter brought chilly weather,
     I hibernated as before.

     Again came springtime, and I was two.
     Strange things did happen; hind legs I grew!
     My front legs sprouted before I knew it,
     And my lungs were growing too.

     Now please don't think that this is the ending,
     With legs and lungs, as we have sung,
     My mouth grew wider, and from inside it,
     Grew a great, big, sticky tongue!

     And while my mouth grew, I was not eating,
     My tadpole tail became so small.
     I used it all up to feed my body,
     Now I have no tail at all!

     I started using my lungs for breathing.
     I changed my eating from plants to meat,
     And I could sing now, a croaky frog song,
     But I was only two inches long.

     Again I slept through the long cold winter.
     Awoke in springtime when I was three.
     I shed my old skin; it was too small,
     Kicked it off, then swallowed it all!

     Kept growing bigger and shedding skin,
     After that first time, three times again!
     Kept eating insects and getting fatter,
     Then I was ready for my long winter's nap.

     And when the spring came and I was four,
     Eating fat insects would have to wait.
     I puffed my throat out and croaked a frog shout,
     I had to find me a pretty froggie mate.

     This is the ending to my long story,
     My lovely frog mate laid many eggs.
     We didn't stay around to be good parents,
     We just hopped away on our frog legs.

     Some frogs of my kind live thirty years.
     You'll hear us croaking in soggy bogs.
     My throat is yellow; my voice does bellow,
     And my name is Mister BULLFROG!


 


"Rhino, Rhino"
(Tune: "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star")

Rhino, rhino, tell me true,
How the zoo is helping you,
So your numbers will not shrink
'Til your species is extinct.
Rhino, rhino, tell  me true,
How the zoo is helping you.

Lucy's note: This is a song for Kdgn - 2nd grade to introduce a discussion about the conservation efforts on behalf of rhinos by the San Diego Zoological Society. the San Diego Zoological Society has won international acclaim for their rhino conservation efforts. The Southern White Rhino is the logo for the Wild Animal Park. The zoo and Wild Animal Park have had success breeding the Southern White Rhino and Great Indian Rhino, and they have launched a program for the captive breeding of the Northern White Rhino, the Black Rhino, and the Sumatran Rhino. All species are on exhibit at either the zoo or the park except the critically endangered Javan Rhino. (The last known captive specimen died in 1907 in Australia.) More information upon request.


 


"How Did You Get Your Name?"
(Tune: "Oh, Susanna")

Oh, rhinoceros, rhinoceros,
How did you get your name?
When they put those letters all together,
They seem so very strange!

Chorus:
     Oh, rhinoceros, ev'rybody knows,
     That you're the only animal
     With horns upon its nose!

Oh, rhinoceros, rhinoceros,
This way your name was formed:
The Greek word "rhino" means a nose,
And "ceros" means a horn!  (chorus)

Lucy's note: "Rhinoceros" is a combination of two Greek words, "rhino," meaning nose, and "ceros," meaning horn. The rhinoceros is the only animal with a horn, or horns, attached to the nose. (Other animals with horns have them attached to their heads.) Rhino horns are made of hard, solid keratin, the type of protein substance that fingernails are made of. If a rhino loses its horn, another will grow.

 


"Wallow Time"
(Tune: "Down in the Meadow in an Itty Bitty Pool")

Down in South Africa in a muddy pool,
Were two white rhinoceroses trying to keep cool.
One to the other said, "Let's wallow all around!"
So they wallowed, and they wallowed,
'Til they turned  muddy brown!
"Slip slide, slip slide, cover all your hide!
Wallow on the left side, and then wallow on the right!
Wallow on the up side, and then wallow on the down!"
So they wallowed, and they wallowed,
'Til they turned a muddy brown!

Lucy's note: Rhinos love to wallow in mud. It helps them cool off, keeps their skin in good condition, and a layer of mud on their hides protects them from insects. Since a white rhino is not truly white, and a black rhino is not truly black, it is sometimes hard to tell them apart if they have been wallowing in the same color of mud. One main difference, however, is the white rhino has a square lip (good for grazing); and the black rhino has a prehensile, pointed upper lip (good for browsing). The lip is used like a finger to grab twigs and leaves and shove them into the mouth, or pull up small shrubs and clumps of grass.


 

Holiday Happenings

 

  

    
"A Christmas Round"

(Tune: Are You Sleeping?)

Santa's coming, Santa's coming,
Children know, Children know,
Jingle, Jangle, Jingle! Jingle, Jangle, Jingle!
Ho, Ho, Ho!   Ho, Ho, Ho!

Reindeer prancing, Reindeer prancing,
In the snow, In the snow,
Jingle, Jangle, Jingle! Jingle, Jangle, Jingle!
Ho, Ho, Ho!   Ho, Ho, Ho!

Stockings hanging, Stockings hanging,
In a row, In a row,
Jingle, Jangle, Jingle! Jingle, Jangle, Jingle!
Ho, Ho, Ho!   Ho, Ho, Ho!

Children listen, Children listen,
Eyes aglow, Eyes aglow,
Jingle, Jangle, Jingle! Jingle, Jangle, Jingle!
Ho, Ho, Ho!   Ho, Ho, Ho!

     

 

 

 


"Valentine Round"

(Tune: White Coral Bells)

Red paper hearts,
White lace that looks so fine,
Cherry lollipops with words that say:
"Be Mine,"
Oh, don't you see,
I promise to be true,
When I send these special Valentines to you.

valcl1f.gif
      

 

 

  


   
"A Song for February"
(Tune: Man on the Flying Trapeze)

Many good things will come your way,
In February on Valentine's Day.
But don't forget the very best part,
Is reading those sweet candy hearts!

Candy Hearts, Candy Hearts, what do you say?
"Cutie Pie," "Sweet Talker,"  "You Make My Day,"
"Heart Throb" and "Awesome" and "My Honey Bun,"
Candy Heart reading is fun!"

Candy Hearts, Candy Hearts, what's your best line?
"Huggy Bug," "Too Cool," or "Will You Be Mine"?
Candy Hearts, Candy Hearts, I have a hunch,
That soon I will eat you for lunch!


      

 

 

  


   
"Lively Little Leprechaun"

Lucy's note: "The legend of the leprechaun tells us that if we catch one, he must share his buried treasure with us. Now leprechauns are very clever. If they can get you to look the other way, they may vanish or wriggle free even if you hold them firmly. This poem I wrote for my grandson who was looking out the window one evening hoping to see a leprechaun in our backyard. (To Kevin Biggs, who one day might see a leprechaun)"

Lively little leprechaun, why are you leaping on my lawn?
Did you from your rainbow slide,
Fall and hurt your bottom side?
Or do you dance with elfin pleasure
Upon your spot of buried treasure?

I'm looking from my window high
To watch you jig 'neath moonlit sky,
Wondering if I came to play,
You would turn and run away,
Or if you'd lead me by the hand
Into the magic of your land.

Lively little leprechaun, why are you leaping on my lawn?
Do you search for four-leaf clover
To share before the night is over,
With tiny friends who look like you,
But hide beyond my window view?

I know that soon you'll disappear
Because the dawn is creeping near,
And I must leave this window scene
Of dancing elf with suit of green,
But tell me, friend, did I just see
You turn your head and wink at me?

 

 

 

  


  
"L.L.L. - Whose Initials Are These?"
(Tune: Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star)

Note from Lucy: "Here is a simple kindergarten through second grade song about the poem above. When writing a song for a classroom learning experience or event, choose a tune already familiar to the students and they will respond with more success. With the words on a large chart or in a booklet you have an effective reading experience.

Lively Little Leprechaun,
Dancing on my clover lawn,
Don't you know the Irish say,
If I catch you, you must pay?
Lively Little Leprechaun,
Let us dance from night 'til dawn!

Lively Little Leprechaun,
Dancing on my clover lawn,
I won't hold you very long,
Only while I sing this song,
Lively Little Leprechaun,
When I turn you will be gone.

 

 

 

  


  
 
"Irish Jig Jingle"
(Tune: Farmer in the Dell)

Do the Irish jig (clap);
Do the Irish jig (clap),
Hi, ho! St. Patrick's Day!
Do the Irish jig (clap)!

Chorus:
Jiggle to the right (clap),

Jiggle to the left (clap),
Hi, ho! St. Patrick's Day!
Do the Irish jig (clap)!

Are you wearing green? (clap)
Are you wearing green? (clap)
Hi, ho! St. Patrick's Day!
Are you wearing green? (clap)

Catch a Leprechaun! (clap)
etc. and repeat chorus.

Clap the Irish way . . .
etc. and repeat chorus.

Snap the Irish way . . .
etc. and repeat chorus.

Are you wearing green (clap)
etc. and repeat chorus.

Please note that I have Lucy's directions for a line dance for this song. Please e-mail me  (www.carl1404@msn.com) to let me know if you would like to have a copy of it!

                                   Cherry Carl

patcl1j.gif 

 

 

  


 
"Lucky Leprechaun"
(Tune: Oh, Susanna)

Oh, I hunted all St. Patrick's Day looking high and low,
I was searching for a leprechaun, but not a one did show.
Oh, I went to bed St. Patrick's night at eight when I was told,
And there beside my pillow lay a shiny pot of gold.
Oh, I'm lucky! Lucky as can be!
No, I did not find a leprechaun, but surely one found me!

patcl1i.gif


 

 

  


A Leprechaun Story/Poem for Believers

I thought I saw a leprechaun jump behind a tree.
When I stooped to take a peek, nothing could I see.
But as I turned to walk away, I heard a tiny sneeze,
And there I saw a leprechaun hiding in the leaves.

"Don't be afraid," I said to him, "Your secret will be safe,
For it's not proper to reveal a person's hiding place."
"You are so kind, my giant friend," said this elf so bold,
"From me you'll get a just reward, this shiny pot of gold."

Without a sound, upon the ground, he placed the glowing treasure;
Then he winked and tipped his hat, "It's surely been a pleasure!"
He disappeared into the woods, never looking back,
And I continued on my way with gold inside my pack.

If you have met a leprechaun,
And believe this story told,
Share with me your magic secrets,
And I'll share with you . . .
My gold.

 

 

 

  


"Leprechauno"
(A Round)
(Tune: "Are You Sleeping?")

Lep-re-chaun-o, Lep-re-chaun-o!
Where are you? Where are you?
Sliding down a rainbow,
Sliding down a rainbow,
Whishhh     (clap)     "OUCH!"
Whishhh     (clap)     "OUCH!"

 

 

  


"Lucky Me!"
(Tune: "Oh, Susanna!")

Oh, I hunted all St. Patrick's Day,
Looking high and low,
I was searching for a leprechaun,
But not a one did show.
Oh, I went to bed St. Patrick's Night,
At eight when I was told,
And there beside my pillow lay,
A shiny pot of gold!
Oh, I'm lucky!
Lucky as can be!
I did not find a leprechaun,
But surely he found me!

 

 

 

  


"I Thought I Saw a Leprechaun"
(A Poem)
 

I thought I saw a leprechaun
Jump behind a tree,
When I stooped to take a peek,
Nothing could I see.
But as I turned to walk away,
I heard a tiny sneeze,
And there I saw that leprechaun
Hiding in the leaves!

"Don't be afraid," I said to him,
"Your secret will be safe,
For it's not proper to reveal
A person's hiding place."

"You are so kind, my giant friend,"
Said this elf so bold,
From me you'll get a just reward,
This shiny pot of gold!"

Upon the ground without a sound
He placed the glowing treasure;
Then winked his eye and tipped is hat,
"It's surely been a pleasure!"

He disappeared into the woods
Never looking back,
And I continued on my way
With gold inside my pack.

If you have met a leprechaun,
And believe this story told,
Share with me your magic secrets,
And I'll share with you my gold.

 

 

  

Note: The following songs are from Lucy's "Peter Rabbit Operetta."


   
clipart/sp1cl17a.gif
"The Peter Rabbit Scrunch"
(Under the Gate, That is . . .)

Lyrics: Cherry Carl and Lucy Jensen
(To the tune of: "Down in the Meadow in an Itty Bitty Pool")

      Down in the garden where the veggies are so green,
      Was Little Peter Rabbit munching on a lima bean,
      Run, Peter Rabbit, don't you know it's getting late?
      But he ate, and he ate, 
          'Til he had a tummyache!

      Hop, hop, nibble, nibble, hear that bunny crunch,
      Little Peter Rabbit wants a carrot for his lunch,
      Run, Peter Rabbit, don't you know it's getting late?
      So he ran, and he ran,
         'Til he reached the garden gate!

      Stop, stop, wiggle, wiggle, do the bunny squeeze,
      Little Peter Rabbit knows he ate too many peas,
      Run, Peter Rabbit, don't you know it's getting late?
      So he scrunched, and he scrunched,
          Right under the gate!

   

"Where is Peter?"
Lyrics: Cherry Carl and Lucy Jensen
(Sung to the tune of "Skip to My Lou")

      Flopsy - Mopsy - Cottontail,
      Putting berries in a pail,
      Being good, just like they should,
      Flopsy - Mopsy - Cottontail.

     
Where is Peter? Do you know?    
      Eating lettuce in a row,

    
Chant: Ohhhhh, Nooooo! Ohhhhh, Nooooo! (no music)
      To the garden he did go!

      Flopsy - Mopsy - Cottontail,
      Took the berries in their pail,
      Home to make a pie to bake,
     
Flopsy - Mopsy - Cottontail.

     Where is Peter? Do tell me.
     Home in bed where he should be!
     Chant: Ohhhhh, Nooooo! Ohhhhh, Nooooo! (no music)
     All he gets is camomile* tea!

After the last verse, everyone can say together sorrowfully:

     Poooooooor Peter Rabbit . . .

Note: camomile*  tea comes from a plant with a daisy-like flower and it is brewed as a medicine, in this case for Peter Rabbit's upset tummy!

"What Do You Take for a Tummyache?"
(Tune: "What Does the Puppy Say To Me?")

      What do you take for a tummyache?
      Lemonade? Chocolate cake?
      Ask Mrs. Rabbit; she will brew
      Camomile tea for You, You, You!

      What do you take for a tummyache?
      Pizza pie? Cherry shake?
      Ask Mrs. Rabbit; she will brew
      Camomile tea for You, You, You!

      What do you take for a tummyache?
      Syrup sweet? On pancakes?
      Ask Mrs. Rabbit; she will brew
      Camomile tea for You, You, You! 
 

 

"The Escape"
(Tune: "Old MacDonald had a Farm")

     Old McGregor had a hoe! E - I - E - I - O!    
     Planting onions in a row! E - I - E - I - O! 
     With a scritch-scratch here,
     And a scritch-scratch there,
     Here, scritch, there, scratch,
     Everywhere a scritch-scratch,
     Old McGregor had a hoe! E - I - E - I - O! 

     Peter Rabbit saw the hoe! E - I - Oh, No, No!
     Said he from the wheelbarrow! E - I - Oh, No, No!
     With an Oh, No, here,
     And an Oh, No, there,
     Here, Oh, there, No,
     Everywhere an Oh, No!
     Peter Rabbit saw the hoe! E - I - Oh, No, No! 

     Hasten, Peter, don't be slow! E - I - E - I - GO! 
     The gate's beyond McGregor's hoe! E - I - E - I - GO! 
     With a hip-hop here,
     And a hip-hop there,
     Here a hip, there a hop, 
     Everywhere a hip-hop,
     Hasten, Peter, don't be slow! E - I - E - I - GO! 

     If you wiggle to and fro, E - I - E - I - O! 
     Underneath the gate you'll go! E - I - E - I - O! 
     With a wiggle-waggle here,
     And a wiggle-waggle there,
     Here  wiggle, there waggle,
     Everywhere a wiggle-waggle,
     Now you're free to safely go! E - I - E - I - O!


"The Sparrow Song" 
(Tune: "Did You Ever See a Lassie?")

     In the garden we were flying,
          were flying, were flying,
     When we heard a bunny crying,
     It must have been you.
     Don't worry; just hurry!
     Don't worry; just scurry!
     You must leave your little jacket,
          your jacket of blue.

     Bunny, dear, you must keep trying,
          keep trying, keep trying,
     From your jacket you'll be sliding,
     And soon you'll be loose,
     Don't worry; just hurry!
     Don't worry; just scurry!
     You must leave your little jacket,
          your jacket of blue.

 

"Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?"
(Tune: "Oh, Dear, What Can the Matter Be?"

     Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
     Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
     Oh, dear, see Mrs. Rabbit, she's
          making some camomile tea.

     Who's that, eating those blackberries?
     Who's that, eating those blackberries?
     Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cottontail,
          won't need some camomile tea.

     Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
     Oh, dear, what can the matter be?
     Oh, dear, poor Peter Rabbit, he's
          taking some camomile tea.

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"Mrs. Rabbit's Warning"
(Tune: "Twinkle, Twinkle")

     Mrs.  Rabbit:
          To the baker's I must run,
          To buy bread and currant buns,
          While I'm gone, have bunny fun,
          Picking berries one-by-one,
          Don't go near that garden gate,
          McGregor's hoe will be your fate!

     Mrs. Rabbit and Animal Chorus:
          Stay away from garden beans,
          Cabbages and parsley greens.
          Through the flowers you may hop,
          Near the garden you must stop.
          Listen to this warning, do,
          Don't become McGregor's stew!

     Flopsy: Don't you worry, Mother Dear,
     Mopsy: Have no worry; have no fear.
     Cottontail: We'll pick berries one-by-one,
     Peter: Then come home when day is done.
     All Bunnies; Listen to our promise true,
                       We won't be McGregor's stew!

clipart/sp1cl15a.gif

 

 

 

  


Easter Things
(adapted from a poem by Elsie Parrish)
(Tune: "Skip to My Lou"

Easter ducks and Easter chicks,

Easter eggs with chocolate thick,

Easter hats for one and all.

Easter Bunny makes a call!

 

Easter baskets full of treats,

Easter jelly beans to eat,

Happy Easter always brings,

Such a lot of pleasant things!


 

 

 

 


"Patriotic Round"
(Tune: Row Your Boat)

Stamp, stamp, stamp your feet
To the drummer's beat,
Rummety, tummety, rummety-tum!
Marching down the street.

Wave, wave, wave your flag
To the drummer's beat,
Rummety, tummety, rummety-tum!
Marching down the street.

Swing, swing, swing your arms
To the drummer's beat,
Rummety, tummety, rummety-tum!
Marching down the street.

Clap, clap, clap your hands
To the drummer's beat,
Rummety, tummety, rummety-tum!
Marching down the street.

Blow, blow, blow your horn
To the drummer's beat,
Rummety, tummety, rummety-tum!
Marching down the street.

 

 


"That's What He Says on Halloween Night"

(Tune: "Skip to My Lou")

Here comes a ghost all dressed in white,
Coming from the cemetery, 
Oh, what a fright!
What will he say when the moon is bright,
Sneaking up behind me on Halloween night?



Chorus:
                          , that's what he/she says,
                          , that's what he/she says,
             
            , that's what he/she says,
Sneaking up behind me on Halloween night!

Here comes a black cat, black as the night,
Green eyes shimmering, 
Oh, what a fright!
What will she say when the moon is bright,
Sneaking up behind me on Halloween night? (Chorus)


Here comes Frankenstein, a terrible sight,
Trudging in the darkness, oh, what a fright!
What will he say when the moon is bright,
Sneaking up behind me on Halloween night? (Chorus)

Here comes a witch riding high in the sky,
Bats on her broomstick, 
Oh, what a fright!
What will she say when the moon is bright,
Sneaking up behind me on Halloween night? (Chorus)

 

 

 

 


"Down in the Graveyard"

(Tune: "Down in the Meadow")

Down in the graveyard in the middle of the night,
Sat three little "ghosties" in their "ghostie" suits of white.
"Fly!" said the "ghostie" who was sitting on the right,
And they flew, and they "booed" on Halloween night!
       


Chorus:
BOO! BOO! HISS! HISS! What a scary sight!
Whirling and a-twirling and causing such a fright!
Moaning and a-groaning with all of their might,
Three little "ghosties" on Halloween night!
                 (skeletons)

Down in the graveyard in the middle of the night,
Sat three little skeletons in bony suits of white.
"Rattle!" said the skeleton sitting on the right,
It didn't matter that they clattered on Halloween night! (chorus)

 

 

 

 


"The Bone Bounce"

(Tune: "If You're Happy and You Know It")

Put your fingers on your cranium, on your cranium.
Put your fingers on your clavicle, on your clavicle.
Put your right hand on your sternum,
Put your left hand on your sternum,
Find your bones; find your bones; find your bones.

                                    

Put your hand on a humerus, on a humerus.
Put your hand on a radius, on a radius.
Put your right hand on an ulna,
Put your left hand on an ulna,
Find your bones; find your bones; find your bones.

Put your hands on your ribs, on your ribs.
Put your hands on your hips, on your hips.
Put your right hand on a femur,
Put your left hand on a femur,
Find your bones; find your bones; find your bones.

Put your hand on a fibula, on a fibula,
Put your hand on a tibia, on a tibia,
Put your phalanges on your phalanges,*
Put your phalanges on your phalanges,
Find your bones; find your bones, find your bones.

*Put your fingers on your toes.

(Note from Lucy: It is easy to work out motions for this song.)

Note from Cherry: Here's a list to refer to when teaching this song:

cranium:      braincase
clavicle:      collar bone
sternum:      breast bone
humerus:      upper arm
radius:        forearm bone on the thumb side
ulna:           forearm bone on the little finger side
femur:        thigh bone
phalanges:   toe and finger bones
tibia:          shin bone
fibula:        leg bone

Here's a skeletal graphic that Lucy handed out with the song lyrics. Maybe it will help! You should see a large group of adults trying to sing this song and find all the correct body parts!

 

 

 


Pizza and Pumpkin Pie
(Adapted from Tune: Old MacDonald)

Old MacDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O!
And on that farm he had a turkey, E-I-E-I-O!
With a gobble, gobble here and a gobble, gobble there,
Here a gobble, there a gobble, everywhere a gobble, gobble,
Old MacDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O!

Old MacDonald had a farm and on Thanksgiving Day,
He wanted most a turkey-roast, but the turkey ran away.
NO gobble, gobble here, NO gobble, gobble, there,
NO here a gobble, there a gobble, ANYWHERE  gobble, gobble,
Old MacDonald's dinner was

PIZZA AND PUMPKIN PIE!!!!!


Mother Nature


"Oh Rainbow Fair"
(Tune: Oh, Christmas Tree)

Oh, rainbow fair, Oh rainbow fair!
Your colors are so lovely!
Oh, rainbow fair, Oh, rainbow fair!
Your colors are so lovely!
Red, orange, yellow, green and blue
Then indigo and violet, too.
Oh, rainbow fair, Oh, rainbow fair!
Your colors are so lovely.

 

raincl1l.gif

This song has been adapted from one by Stella Waldron.
The colors are in the correct order of colors in the primary rainbow from top to bottom.

 

 

 


"In the Heart of a Seed"
(Kate L. Brown)
(Adapted by Lucy Jensen to the Tune: "Twinkle, Twinkle")

In the heart of a seed buried deep, so deep,
A dear little plant lay fast asleep.
"Wake," said the sunshine, "Creep to the light;"
"Wake," said the voice of the raindrops bright.
The little plant heard and rose to see
What the beautiful outside world might be!

Please note that the "Twinkle, Twinkle" song begins with the word "heart" in the first line. You'll need to sing two G notes for "In the."

 

  


   
"Puddles"
(Tune: "Are You Sleeping")

It is raining.

It is raining.

Let's go play.

Let's go play.

Marching through the puddles,

Forgetting all our troubles!

Splish! Splash! Plop!

Splish! Splash! Plop!


 

 

 

  


   
"Rain"
 

The rain is raining all around.

It falls on field and tree.

It rains on the umbrellas here,

And on the ships at sea.


Note: I have the sheet music for this if anyone wants it.

 

 

 

 

  


   
"Rain is Raining All Around"
(Tune: "If You're Happy and You Know It")

Rain is raining all around, all around, (3 claps)
Rain is raining all around, all around, (3 claps)
It is raining on the fields,
It is raining on the trees,
It is raining on the sailing ships at sea. (3 claps)

Rain is raining everywhere, everywhere, (3 claps)
Rain is raining on umbrellas here and there, (3 claps)
It is raining on the birds,
It is raining on the bees,
It is even raining down on you and me! (3 claps)

Rain is raining all around, all around, (3 claps)
Rain is raining on the ground, on the ground, (3 claps)
Making puddles, splash, splishy,
Making mud so ishy, squishy,
So our boots can make a squishy, squashy sound! (3 claps)


 

 

 

  


   
"Who Has Seen the Wind?"
(Tune: "Oats, Peas, Beans")

Who has seen the wind?
Neither I nor you;
But when the trees bow low their heads,
The wind is passing through.
Who has seen the wind?
Neither you nor I;
But when the leaves are trembling,
The wind is passing by.

 

Adapted from a poem by Christina Rossetti

 

 

 

  


   

"When the Birdies Open Wide"
(Tune: "Twinkle, Twinkle")

When the birdies open wide,

What does mama put inside?

Juicy worms and grimy grubs,

Grasshoppers and beetle bugs.

I'm so glad I know it's true,

I don't eat what birdies do!


 

 

 

 

  


   
sprsg1c.gif

"That's the Way the Flowers Grow"
(Words adapted from Poem by Grace Conant)
(Tune: "Polly Wolly Doodle")

Oh, you take some little seeds,
And you take a little soil,
And you pat them all together in a row.
Then you take a little sun,
And you take a little rain,
And that's the way the flower grow.

Chorus:
Don't you know? Don't you know?
That's the way the flowers grow!
Pushin' up and reachin' out 
With leaves and petals all about!
That's the way the flowers grow!

        Oh, you clap your little hands,
        And you sing this little song,
        And you smile at them with eyes aglow,
        And you give a little cheer
        When you see each bud appear
        'Cause that's the way the flowers grow! (Chorus)


 

 

Songs of the Seasons

 

  


   
sprsg1c.gif

"Springtime Round"
(Tune: Row Your Boat)

Have fun! Exaggerate the consonants!

Busy, busy, busy bee,
Humming merrily!
Buzzz! Buzzz! Buzzz! Buzzz!
Don't you dare sting me!

beecl1m.gif beecl1g.gif

Chirpy, chirpy, chirpy bird,
Don't you take a rest?
Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet!
Singing in your nest!

     

Croaky, croaky, croaky frog,
Sing your springtime song,
Ribbit! Ribbit! Ribbit! Ribbit!
May we sing along?

Fuzzy, wuzzy, yellow ducklings,
Swimming all around,
Quack! Quack! Quack! Quack!
Diving upside down!

 

 

  


   
"Another Springtime Round"
(Tune: "Tommy Tinker")

Listen to the cuckoo,
Singing loud and clear,
Telling us that spring is near.
Cuckoo! Cuckoo!
It's the best time of the year!

 

 

  


   
"Signs of Spring"
(Tune: Blue Tail Fly/Jimmie Crack Corn)

How do you know when winter has gone?
You can hear the bluebird's song.
How do you know when spring is here?
Flowers bloom and bring good cheer.

Chorus:
Look around you here and there.
Signs of spring are everywhere.
Eyes and ears will find each clue.
See if you can name a few!

How do you when winter has gone?
Out to graze come the doe and fawn.
How do you know when spring is here?
A bullfrog croaks in a voice so queer. (Chorus)

How do you know when winter has gone?
Butterflies dance upon my lawn.
How do you know when spring is here?
Baby birds in nests appear. (Chorus)

How do you know when winter has gone?
Showers and rainbows come along.
How do you know when spring is here?
Bees are buzzing in my ear (Chorus)

How do you know when winter has gone?
The sun shines warm and the days grow long.
How do you know when spring is here?
The snow begins to disappear. (Chorus)

How do you know when winter has gone?
We are singing this springtime song!
How do you know when spring is here?
It's that baseball time of year! (Chorus)

Lucy's note: You can insert your home team's name in place of baseball in the last verse. Children can also make up more verses with their own thoughts about spring.

 

 

 

  


   
"Puddles"
(Tune: "Down in the Meadow")

Down in the meadow where the grass is rainy wet,
Let's go finding puddles we've not waded in as yet,
Jump right in the middle of that dirty muddy ooze . . .
And wiggle, squiggle toes around inside our soggy shoes!

Wiggle, Squiggle, all around,
     Hear that squishy sound!
Jump into a puddle;
     Sink into the muddy ground!
Let's go finding puddles
     We've not waded in as yet,
Down in the meadow where the grass is rainy wet!

 

 

 

  


   
"Spring Fever"
(adapted from a poem by Richard LeGalliene)
(Tune: "Mulberry Bush")

     I meant to do my work today,
     But a brown bird sang in the apple tree.
     A butterfly flitted across the field . . . and
     All the leaves were calling me!
     The wind went sighing over the land,
     Tossing the grasses to and fro
     And a rainbow held out its shining hand,
     So what could I do but laugh and go?




 

 

 

  


Spring Song
(Tune: "This Old Man")

Downside up; upside down,

Do a cartwheel round and round,

With your feet up high and hands upon the ground,

Whirl and twirl just like a clown!

 

Downside up; upside down,

Do a cartwheel round and round,

Turning over clover making not a sound,

Roll yourself all over town!

 

(Repeat Verse 1)

This is an adaptation from a poem by Carl Sandburg.


 

 

 

  


   
"April Showers"
(Original Words: B.G. DeSylva; Music: Louis Silvers)

Lucy's note: I composed a second verse to extend a spring theme to include the "science" of a rainbow.
               raincl1k.gif
When April sun shines through skies of gray,
It bends a rainbow across your way.   raincl1k.gif
When sun meets raindrop, have no regrets,
Because the colors splash from red to orange,
    raincl1k.gif  to blue and violet!
And where you see clouds upon the hills,    raincl1k.gif
You soon will see crowds of daffodils!
So keep on looking for the sunshine, 
And sing this rainbow song,
Whenever April showers come along.   raincl1k.gif

raincl1k.gif            raincl1k.gif

raincl1k.gif

raincl1e.gif
 

 

 

  


   
"Good Old Summertime"
(Original Song by Evans-Shields)
(Adapted by Lucy Jensen)

In the good old summertime,
In the good old summertime.
Strolling down the sandy beach,
Singing a summer rhyme:
"We wear no shoes by the ocean blue,
And that's a very good sign.
It's a funny, sunny day
In the good old summertime."

In the good old summertime,
In the good old summertime.
Playing on the sandy beach,
Singing a summer rhyme:
"Sand castles stand on the summer sand,
And that's a very good sign,
It's a sandy, dandy day
In the good old summertime."

In the good old summertime,
In the good old summertime.
Sitting on the sandy beach,
Singing a summer rhyme:
"Umbrella shade and pink lemonade,
And that's a very good sign,
It's a crazy, lazy day
In the good old summertime."

sumsg1a.gif

 

 

 


Autumn Leaves
(Tune: Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star)

On a camping trip, my four year old granddaughter enjoyed stomping through a mound of dried fallen leaves under an oak tree. Preschoolers, kindergarteners, and first graders can do motions to this poem/song: fluttering their fingers, swirling and twirling, and pretending to march through fallen leaves.

Leaves of autumn flutter down,
Red and yellow, orange and brown.
In the breeze they swirl around,
Landing softly on the ground.
I can make a crunchy sound
Jumping on a leafy mound.

Leaves of autumn flutter down,
Red and yellow, orange and brown.
In the breeze they swirl around,
Landing softly on the ground.
Tell me, do the trees get cold
When they lose their leafy clothes?

 

 

Phonics Fun

 

Old Mark Farmer
(Fun with the "vowel + r" sounds)
(Tune: "Old MacDonald")

     All sing:
          Old Mark Farmer had a farm.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!
          And on this farm he had a barn.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!

     All say:
          And what was in that barn?
               1. A pig eating corn,
               2. A girl with a curl,
               3. And a spider beside her,
               4. A dog with a bark,
               5. A bird called a lark,
               6. And a herd of aardvarks?

     All sing:
          Old Mark Farmer had a farm.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!
          And on this farm he had a barn.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!

     All say:
          And what was in that barn?
               1. An urn full of dirt,
               2. A jar full of tar,
               3. A car with a horn,
               4. A shirt that was torn,
               5. A round ball of yarn,
               6. And a herd of aardvarks?

     All sing:
          Old Mark Farmer had a farm.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!
          And on this farm he had a barn.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!

     All say:
          And what was in that barn?
               1. Thirty green turtles,
               2. Forty striped tigers,
               3. A turkey named Burt,
               4. A stork with a fork
               5. Eating part of a tart,
               6. And a herd of aardvarks?

     All sing:
          Old Mark Farmer had a farm.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!
          And on this farm he had a barn.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!

     All say:
          And what was in that barn?
               1. A turning top,
               2. A shining star,
               3. A squirming viper,
               4. A swimming shark,
               5. Who will do no harm,
               6. And a herd of aardvarks?

     All sing:
          Old Mark Farmer had a farm.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!
          And on this farm he had a barn.
          or, ir, ur, er, ar!

     All say:
          And what was in that barn?
               1. A furry squirrel,
               2. A gorilla that surfs,
               3. A horse with a cart,
               4. A giraffe with a purse,
               5. All having a party,
               6. With a herd of Aardvarks?

 

Math Magic


"Counting Along song"
(A lively tune for Kdg. - 1st grade)
(Tune: "Lou, Lou, Skip to My Lou")

Counting along the number line.
Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
Try it now, and you will see.
It's as easy as can be!

1 and 2 and 3 and 4;
Clap your hands and count some more.
5 and 6, 7, 8;
Who do we appreciate?

9 and 10, 11, 12;
You can do this by yourself.
13, 14, 15, 16;
Don't stop now, the light is green!

Counting along the number line.
Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
Go to the right for adding fun.
Go to the left and take away one!

16, 15, 14, 13;
Counting backwards, you are learning.
12, 11, 10 and 9;
Stick with me, you'll do just fine.

8 and 7, 6 and 5;
Keep this number jive alive.
4 and 3 and 2 and 1,
Now we're through, the counting's done!

Lucy's note: Make sure to have a number line from zero to sixteen available when you sing this song together. See sample below.

0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16

 

 


"A Pig Sty Song"
(For having fun and counting backwards)
(Tune: "Ten in the Bed")

Ten pigs in the sty, and the little one cried, 
"I'm crowded! Roll over!"
So they all rolled over and one rolled out,
Nine pigs in the sty, and the little one cried,
"I'm crowded! Roll over!"
So they all rolled over and one rolled out,
Eight pigs in the sty, and the little one cried,
"I'm crowded! Roll over!"
So they all rolled over and one rolled out,
Seven . . . etc.

Continue the countdown and the last verse goes like this:
One pig in the sty, and that little pig cried,
"I'm lonely! Come back now!"

To convert to a bear song, sing:
"Ten bears in a bed, and the little said, 
"I'm crowded! Roll over!"

Continue as before, but the last verse changes:
One bear in the bed, and that little bear said,
"Goooood Night!"  

 

 

 


"Count by Tens"
(Tune: "Clementine")

Sing this song, and count along, and
Follow me; you'll do just fine.
Count by tens and stay together;
Sing along the number line.

Ten and twenty, thirty, forty, 
Fifty, sixty
; doing fine.
Seventy, eighty, ninety, hundred;
Sing along the number line.

Sing this song, and count along, and
Follow me; you'll do just fine.
Try it backwards; stay together;
Sing back down the number line.

Hundred, ninety, eighty, seventy,
Sixty, fifty; doing fine.
Forty, thirty, twenty, ten;
Sing back down the number line!


 


"Multiples Melody"
(Count by Twos)
(Tune: "Lou, Lou, Skip to My Lou")

Multiples are, if you should wonder,
Counting by a certain number.
Try it now and you will see.
It's as easy as can be!

 2 and 4 and 6 and 8;
Who do we appreciate?!
10 and 12, 14, 16;
Don't stop now, the light is green!

18, 20, 22, 24;
Clap your hands and count some more.
26, 28, 30, 32;
Stick together like super glue!

Counting along the number line,
Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
Go to the right and add with the pack.
Go to the left and you subtract!

32, 30, 28, 26;
It's as easy as picking up sticks.
24, 22, 20, 18;
Don't stop now, the light is green!

16, 14, 12, and 10;
Take a breath and start again.
8 and 6 and 4 and 2;
Take a bow 'cause now you're through!

Lucy's note: Counting by two along the number line is the same as naming "multiples" of two.

 


"Multiples Melody"
(Count by Threes)
(Tune: "Lou, Lou, Skip to My Lou")

Multiples are, if you should wonder,
Counting by a certain number.
Try it now and you will see.
It's as easy as can be!

3 and 6 and 9 and 12;
You can do this by yourself.
15, 18, 21, 24;
Clap your hands and count some more.

27, 30, 33, 36;
It's as easy as picking up sticks.
39, 42, 45, 48;
Who do we appreciate?!

Counting along the number line,
Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
Go to the right and add with the pack.
Go to the left and you subtract!

48, 45, 42, 39; 
Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
36, 33, 30, 27;
Keep on trying and don't give in!

24, 21, 18, 15;
Don't stop now, the light is green!
12 and 9 and 6 and 3;
It's as easy as can be! 

Lucy's note: Counting by threes is the same as naming "multiples" of three.


 


"Multiples Melody"
(Count by Six for 3rd and 4th graders)
(Tune: "Lou, Lou, Skip to My Lou")

Lucy's note: "When using a more difficult "count-by," like six, just shorten the song by 2 verses.)

Multiples are, if you should wonder,
Counting by a certain number.
Try it now and you will see.
It's as easy as can be.

6 and 12, 18, 24;
Clap your hands and count some more.
30, 36, 42, 48;
Who do we appreciate?!

Counting along the number line.
Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
Go to the right and add with the pack,
Go to the left and you subtract!

48, 42, 36, 30;
Chicken Little and Turkey Lurkey!
24, 18, 12, and 6;
It's as easy as picking up sticks!

Lucy's note: You can make up a jingle for any "count by." the students can make up new lines to follow the numbers, or you can stick to these:

If the number counting line rhymes with:
     2  - Stick together like super glue!
     3 -  It's as easy as can be!
     4 -  Clap your hands and count some more.
     5 -  Keep this number jive alive!
     6 -  It's as easy as picking up sticks!
     7 -  Keep on trying and don't  give in.
     8 -  Who do we appreciate?!
     9 -  Stick with me; you'll do just fine.
    10 -  Take a breath and start again.
    12 -  You can do this by yourself.
    20 -  Pepperoni pizza with cheese a-plenty.
 teen  - Don't stop now, the light is green!

 

Miscellaneous Music


"A Morning Song"
(Tune: "It's a Small World")

Chorus:
     It is time for school to start.
     We'll do reading, math and art.
     We'll all learn to be so smart.
     It is time for school.

Verse:
     It is time for school; it is time for fun.
     It's a time for learning for everyone.
     So, sit down; take a seat.
     We are in for a treat.
     It is time for school to start. (chorus)


 

 


"Let It Start With You and Me"
(Tune: "This Land is Your Land" W. Guthrie)

Chorus:
     This land is your land,
     This land is my land,
     From California to the New York island;
     There's a solution to this pollution;
     And it will start with you and me!

Verse:
     As I was driving down an L.A. highway,
     I saw above me a smoggy skyway,
     My eyes were burning, my stomach churning,
     E.T., I know why you went home! (chorus)

     Ground-level ozone was all around me,
     Carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide,
     My lungs were wheezing, my nose was sneezing,
     E.T., I know why you went home! (chorus) 

Lucy's note: This song is an attempt to combine a fun, sing-along type of song with lyrics that emphasize 3 serious facts about our air pollution:

     1.  "Solutions to the pollution: must come from an awareness and action
         of the people;
    2.  Smog is an unhealthy condition; and
    3.  Names of three specific chemicals (although they are not the only ones)
        in smog as we know it.

 

 


"Earth Day"
(Tune: "Mulberry Bush")

     Every day is Earth Day here,
     Every day of every year.
     Take time out to think about
     A way to get into gear!
    
     Recycle the trash; bicycle to town!
     Don't throw your litter all over the ground!
     Stop wasting water and turn off the lights,
     To keep up the Earth-saver fight!

     Everybody must be prepared
     In every way to do their share.
     You must start to do your part
     To make the message clear!

     Carry your bag to the store when you shop.
     Buy only things that you're needing a lot.
     Check for the "circle of arrows" that say:
     "You're saving the Earth-saver way!"

Lucy's note: April 21st is Earth Day!